Denver Zoo Map

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week's feathered friend, Patsy, the Micronesian kingfisher (Todiramphus cinnamomina cinnamomina). Patsy is one of three species of kingfisher that live on the islands of Micronesia. Her species originated from the island of Guam, while the other two are located on the islands of Palau and Pohnpei.

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

I am preparing to dive into frigid waters for the Polar Plunge next month, in support of an amazing cause that is close to my heart, the Special Olympics Colorado. As I contemplate my lack of preparedness (how does one prepare?), I am reminded of what the event is really about, bringing attention to those with special needs and finding solutions to support them in our community.

By Jessica Leckrone, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Baby Mike, the Egyptian plover (Pluvianus aegyptius). Baby Mike is a female Egyptian plover, also known as the crocodile bird. She gets her name from one the keepers who assisted with her hatch, as well cared for her until she was an adult. She hatched at Denver Zoos propagation building on April 4, 2012. There, her keeper, Mike, made sure that she had everything she needed to become a healthy adult.

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

Denver Zoo is a place where many come to escape from the challenges of everyday life. Last month, we hosted a special Zoo Lights party for the young residents of Denver Children's Home that allowed one particular young man to do just that.

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

I was very touched by a story I heard recently about a pair of 11-year-old twins who visited the Zoo at the end of December. The interesting thing about their visit was what they held in their hands and intended to do with it.

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing this week’s feathered friend, Bella Donna, a Blue-crowned laughingthrush (Dryonastes courtoisi). And yes, laughingthrush is actually one word in this case. Blue-crowned laughingthrushes were formerly a subspecies of yellow-throated laughingthrushes (Garrulax galbanus), but split off to their own species. Members of this species have a pale, grey crown opposed to the blue color on the blue-crowned laughingthrushes, but otherwise the two look very similar.

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

This week’s feathered friend is Sue the hamerkop (Scopus umbretta), who came to Denver Zoo in 2014 with her mate, George, from San Diego Zoo. They live in the Rainforest Room of Bird World, Presented by Frontier Airlines. You can distinguish George from Sue because of his interesting “hairstyle.” Like his namesake from Seinfeld, he has a balding pattern of missing feathers on top his head. Sue has distinctive white “eyebrows” or feathers that set her apart in looks.

By Anna Taugher, Denver Zoo Horticulturist

When you think of Colorado, what images come to mind? Most likely, they include mountain lions, big horn sheep and bears (oh my!), of course, in the picturesque setting of steep Rocky Mountains and evergreen trees.

By Shannon Block, President/CEO

Have you ever seen a wild horse? I’m not talking about the stallions that gallop across the ranges of North America. They are actually the feral descendants of domesticated horses. What I’m referring to here is the Przewalski's horse, pronounced “sheh-VAL-skee’s,” which is the only truly wild horse in existence. And, it has a very interesting story—it was once extinct.

By Jennifer Preusser, Denver Zoo Bird Keeper

Introducing D Reverend, the green-naped pheasant pigeon (Otidiphaps nobilis nobilis) and new resident here at Denver Zoo. D Reverend is a little over 1 year old. He is a popular resident of the Rainforest Room, since he is so active and frequently moves around the room, coming very close to people. He is joined by another green-naped pheasant pigeon named Myrtle. You can recognize D Reverend by his orange colored band.

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