February 18, 2022

Putting a ‘Stamp’ on Conservation

Denver Zoo’s Erica Elvove Was Recently Sworn in as the Newest Member of the Colorado Habitat Stamp Committee 

Perhaps the greatest risk to wildlife today is the threat of significant and rapid habitat loss, in Colorado and around the globe. The solution must offer a balance of public and private cooperation. In support of this value, Denver Zoo’s Senior Vice President for Conservation Engagement & Impact, Erica Elvove, has been appointed to the State of Colorado Wildlife Habitat Stamp Committee. Funded by outdoor enthusiasts from across the state, the Governor’s wildlife habitat committee offers grants for landowners to permanently establish their land for protected conservation easement, public access and/or wildlife viewing. 

Denver Zoo is dedicated to excellence in wildlife conservation and animal care. We put action to our mission of inspiring communities to save wildlife for future generations, through strategic efforts at the zoo, in our local community and around the globe. Visitors and supporters allow us to actively protect wildlife and wild spaces, while engaging the next generation of conservationists through meaningful and inspiring learning experiences. 

Representing the Zoo on the committee as an established conservation organization, Elvove hopes to make policy-level impact for wildlife through promoting responsible habitat protection across the state of Colorado. These efforts complement the Zoo’s field conservation work in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains, as we strive to protect Colorado’s precious ecosystems.  

The Conservation Engagement & Impact (CEI) division is working hard to position Denver Zoo as a global, conservation alliance: 

  • Global: Zoo habitat themes and field projects in Colorado, Latin America, Australia, Asia, and Africa. 
  • Conservation: Collaborative community engagement, grounded in social and ecological science. 
  • Alliance: Partnerships and collaborations that represent best practices in conservation practice. 

Positive experiences in nature are shown to have beneficial effects for our mental and physical health. Despite the importance of nature in our lives, wild animals and spaces are at risk, so what does that mean for our interconnected future? Denver Zoo is committed to the pursuit of a better world for wildlife and people. Join us in our movement for wildlife by following us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and TikTok

 

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